Tag Archives: why we sleep

Why We Sleep

The question arises of what exactly is the purpose of sleep.  The short answer is that we don’t know exactly.  However, as the science of sleep progresses, our understanding as to the true purpose of sleep will likely be elucidated.

The fact that in deep NREM sleep physical and mental activity slow down considerably, has led to the reasonable speculation that this phase of sleep serves as a recovery and recharging function. While lower species don’t have REM sleep, almost all species do have NREM suggesting that this phase of sleep has a restorative function. When you’re in NREM you’re recharging your batteries. More specifically, N3 sleep or deep sleep is felt to be the most restorative.

This recharging function is essential because a prime consideration of both the brain and body is energy production and conservation. The brain’s prime goal is survival and its primary defense system, the fight/flight system, uses a lot of energy. Thus the production and conservation of energy is a critical function and it is assumed that NREM fills this role. When people are deprived of NREM sleep they do continue to feel very tired and the body tries to compensate for this on subsequent sleep occasions.

If NREM is about energy conservation, what is REM? Paradoxically REM uses a lot of energy. Perhaps the NREM phase of recovery, mentioned above, is among other things, designed to ensure that there’s enough energy for the REM phase?

Some researchers have argued that because of the high energy output in REM, the energy conservation of sleep overall is pretty small, particularly compared to being awake and just resting. Others have pointed out that if restoration of energy was the purpose of sleep, large animals should require more sleep, but in fact they sleep less.

One view of the energy consuming REM phase of sleep is that its main function is the consolidation of memories formed during the day. This would be crucial for learning and indeed young children do seem to require more REM than adults. One metaphor that might be useful here is that during the REM phase of sleep, the brain is filing away the day’s events. As you open the relevant filing cabinet you will see other associated ideas and other relevant recent events and their associations. If that were the case, our dreams would involve recent events and associations these events have with past experiences. Of course, a lot of dreams are like that. Moreover, the dreamer’s emotional state at the time of the dream would likely shape the dream sequence. So it’s likely that some consolidation of memories occurs during REM sleep and this process helps to explain dreaming.

While the consolidation of memories might be an efficient use of sleep time, it doesn’t appear too critical to functioning. As mentioned above, many species don’t even have a REM sleep phase, and when REM is suppressed it doesn’t appear to affect basic functioning.  However, in humans, when REM is suppressed for while, as in heavy alcohol consumption, there is a period after the REM suppression in withdrawal, during which there is increased amounts of REM sleep, what is called REM rebound.

The evidence is not overwhelming but it is reasonable to assume that NREM sleep serves some energy restoration function and that NREM sleep serves some neural consolidation of memories and learning.

Now we have a better understanding of sleep, it has allowed us to research sleep patterns and determine the type, rate and costs of poor quality sleep, reduced sleep time, or a combination of both. And we have been unable to expose the myth, common until about 20 years ago, that sleep deprivation or poor quality sleep doesn’t cause serious health and economic consequences.

What is Sleep?

 

What is sleep?

Regardless of the various theories, we know that sleeping is a natural function common to all humans and animals, too. We are designed to function on a wake/sleep cycle, although with the advent of artificial light (thank you, Edison for the 1879 introduction of the light bulb), energy boosting drinks, foods and medications, that cycle can be severely disrupted. However, it is clear that daily sleep is the preferred default setting for humans and that sleeping serves some very important functions that underpin health and wellbeing. However, there isn’t a complete agreement on what the functions of sleep actually are.

Sleep can simply be described as a state of reduced sensory and environmental responsiveness and physical inactivity. By comparison, wakefulness is characterized by, sensory perception, thinking, environmental responsiveness and physical activity.

There are various stages of sleep in mammals; the two most prominent are Rapid Eye Movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep. These two phases are quite different.

In REM sleep, muscles are effectively paralyzed, what is called atonia, and dreaming occurs. Obviously, it’s a good design feature to be paralyzed while dreaming otherwise many of us would be sleep walking and acting out or dreams with physical actions. This atonia is achieved through muscle inhibition by parts of the brain that regulate movement.    Interestingly, there is a sleep disorder called REM Behavior Disorder which is characterized by individuals acting out their dreams.

In REM there is also an increase in breathing and heart rate variability. In addition, in REM the brain also uses a lot of energy, which is important because one theory of sleep is that it is about energy conservation, which might seem paradoxical. There is obviously a lot of mental activity in REM unlike in the other sleep phase, which has earned the REM phase of sleep “paradoxical sleep.”  Core temperature is less well regulated in REM but sexual arousal is common and independent of dream content. In other words, physiology comes first and arousal is experienced, which may or may not be incorporated into a dream’s content.

NREM sleep is characterized as featuring general immobility, regular respiration and heart rate, and slow mental activity. It is divided into three parts:

N1: falling asleep, just in that border between nodding off but still easily awoken

N2: breathing and heart rate slow as you drift off to sleep

N3:  the slow wave delta phase that characterizes NREM. The hallmark feature of N3 sleep is slow, high amplitude delta waves on EEG.  The first episode lasts 45-90 minutes but gets progressively shorter though the night. Children tend to have more N3 sleep than older individuals.

These two phases of sleep are so different that they have led to speculation that there is more than one function of sleep and those functions are represented by these quite different states.

In addition to these separate and distinct sleep states, there is also a typical pattern of sleep in humans as we move in and out of these different phases.

Brain Wave Activity

Delta: 1-4 cycles per second: Deep sleep. Typical NREM phase

Theta: 5-8 cycles per second: Conscious, but low level of brain activation, e.g. meditation.

Alpha: 9-13 cycles per second: Relaxed wakefulness

Beta: 14-30 cycles per second: Active processing, stress.

Sleep Cycles

Sleep occurs in cycles that typically last 90 minutes; the ultradian sleep cycle.  Sleep proceeds from NREM phase to a REM phase, about five times a night. There is typically more NREM in the earlier part of sleep and more REM in the later part of the night or early morning. This is why people commonly awaken during their dreams.  REM accounts for between 20% and 25% of total sleep time.

The way in which a person cycles through these phases, as well as the quality of the stages of sleep, determines the healthiness or otherwise of sleep. There are almost 80 distinct types of sleep disorders, which reflect different dysfunctions in the stages and phases of sleep.